Galleria Borghese logo
Search results for
X
No results :(

Hints for your search:

  • Search engine results update instantly as soon as you change your search key.
  • If you have entered more than one word, try to simplify the search by writing only one, later you can add other words to filter the results.
  • Omit words with less than 3 characters, as well as common words like "the", "of", "from", as they will not be included in the search.
  • You don't need to enter accents or capitalization.
  • The search for words, even if partially written, will also include the different variants existing in the database.
  • If your search yields no results, try typing just the first few characters of a word to see if it exists in the database.

Self-portrait as Bacchus (known as “Sick Bacchus”

Merisi Michelangelo called Caravaggio

(Milan 1571 - Porto Ercole 1610)

Like the Giovane con canestra di frutta [Young Man with a Basket of Fruit] (inv. 136), this canvas was also among the group of works confiscated in 1607 from Giuseppe Cesari – called the Cavalier d’Arpino - accused by Paul V’s tax authorities of the illegal possession of firearms. In order to gain his freedom, the painter was forced to give his collection of pictures to the Apostolic Chamber. The collection was given in turn by the Pope to his nephew Scipione Borghese shortly thereafter.

The painting is an extremely realistic portrayal of the figure of a young man with the typical attributes of Bacchus, the god of wine and inebriation. He is turned toward the viewer in an atypical three-quarter pose, holding in his hands a bunch of lush green grapes, which clearly contrast with his bluish unhealthy complexion.

Critics have identified in the subject a possible self-portrait of the artist, by tracing the painting back to a documented event in the painter’s life, namely his hospitalisation at the Ospedale della Consolazione in Rome for undefined circumstances. This interpretation provides the origin for the work’s title: Autoritratto in veste di Bacco (Self-portrait in the Guise of Bacchus)or more commonly, Bacchino malato (Sick Bacchus).


Object details

Inventory
534
Location
Date
1595 circa
Classification
Period
Medium
oil on canvas
Dimensions
cm 67 x 53
Provenance

Rome, Giuseppe Cesari, called Cavalier d’Arpino, before 1607, inv. no. 54 (De Rinaldis 1936, p. 577). Cardinal Scipione Borghese, 1607. Inv. 1693, room VII, no. 46. Inv. 1790, room X, no. 40. Inventario Fidecommissario 1833, p. 19. Purchased by the Italian State, 1902



Exhibitions
  • 1951 Milano, Palazzo Reale;
  • 1986-1987 Roma, Palazzo Barberini;
  • 1995-1996 Roma, Museo Capitolini;
  • 1998 Roma, Palazzo Venezia;
  • 1999-2000 Roma, Galleria Borghese;
  • 2000-2001 Milano, Palazzo Reale;
  • 2003 Napoli, Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte;
  • 2007 Roma, Scuderie del Quirinale;
  • 2011-2012 Forth Worth, Kimbell Art Museum;
  • 2014-2015 Roma, Villa Medici;
  • 2020 Bergamo, Accademia Carrara.
Conservation and Diagnostic
  • 1964-1965 Alvaro Esposti (rimozione della vernice ingiallita, reintegrazioni);
  • 2001 Giantomassi-Zari (indagini diagnostiche).

Commentary

This work was part of the collection of paintings belonging to Giuseppe Cesari, called Cavalier d’Arpino, that was sequestered in 1607 when he was accused by Paul V’s tax officials of the illegal possession of a few arquebuses. The painting, along with Boy with Basket of Fruit (inv. 136) and 105 other works, was taken from the artist’s workshop and given by the pope to Cardinal Scipione Borghese, thus becoming part of the powerful prelate’s already large collection.

The work, one of Caravaggio’s first paintings, was unquestionably made in Rome, as also suggested by various contemporaries, including Giulio Mancini, who noted in his Considerazioni sulla pittura that it was painted in the home of Monsignor Pandolfo Pucci, where the artist was staying when he arrived in the city. According to Maurizio Marini (2011, pp. 43–44), the first owner of the painting was Costantino Spada, a dealer whose name was deciphered by the scholar in an almost illegible annotation to the Marciana’s copy of Mancini’s volume, an interpretation that had already been advanced by Marco Gallo in 2001 (pp. 43–70, 55).

The painting was identified in 1948 by Aldo De Rinaldis as the one cited in 1642 in Giovanni Baglione’s Vite, where we read that Caravaggio: ‘[...] painted a few portraits of himself in the mirror. And the first was a Bacchus with a few bunches of different grapes, made with great care but a bit dry in manner’ (Baglione 1642, p. 136), a theory rejected by Roberto Longhi, who considered the Bacchus described by the biographer to be the one commissioned by Cardinal Francesco Maria del Monte (Florence, Galleria degli Uffizi), which was made in all probability with the aid of a mirror, as indicated by the goblet held in the sitter’s left hand.

Following this long debate over whether it is the one in Florence or the one in Rome, almost all scholars now agree that the Bacchus cited by Baglione is the one in Rome, reading a few details, such as the later dating of the Uffizi version (about 1597) and stylistic differences in the handling of the facial features, as tangible proof.

The painting, which was not included in Iacomo Manilli’s description of the villa in 1650, is reported for the first time in the 1693 Borghese inventory, where it is described as ‘a painting on canvas measuring three palms by Caravaggio with a Bacchus with a crown of laurel on his head and a bunch of grapes in his hand and a bunch of black grapes at his feet with two peaches no. 475 with gilt frame’, and then in 1790 as ‘A Satyr, Caravaggio’. Confused in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century inventories with the Satyr’s Head Crowned with Vines by Pietro Paolo Bonzi (inv. 160), the painting was mistakenly listed as a work by Ludovico Carracci in the Inventario Fidecommissario of 1833, considered by Matteo Marangoni, Ludwig Schudt and Walter Friedländer to be a good copy.

The attribution of the painting was firmly restored to Caravaggio by Longhi, who gave it the title by which it is known today, Sick Bacchus, and interpreted the subject as a self-portrait of the painter in the guise of Bacchus. According to the scholar, the colour of the skin and lips is a reference to a personal episode, specifically a period of convalescence for unclear reasons, although this colouring was read by Maurizio Marini as the consequence of a shoddy restoration.

Longhi’s interpretation of the painting as a self-portrait of the artist was followed over the years by other theories, including Kurt Bauch’s argument linking the painting to the portrayal of the five senses, in particular taste; Lynch’s theory that it is an allegory of melancholy; Herwarth Röttgen’s idea that it depicts the effects of Bacchus’s drunkenness and Maurizio Calvesi’s proposal that the Bacchus is a prefiguration of Christ, holding a bunch of grapes, a symbol of his Passion and an allusion to the Eucharist and divine love.

Amidst those who have argued that the painting is linked to the milieu of contemporary literary academies and those who have instead seen it as connected to the society world of the patrons or the painter’s presumed homosexuality, Kristina Hermann Fiore was the first to interpret it as an homage to artistic inspiration. This reading was then fleshed out and clarified by Philip Morel who, starting from a Self-Portrait by Giovan Paolo Lomazzo, a painter and theoretician who headed the Accademia di Val di Blenio, concentrated on one of the many facets of the painting’s Bacchic component. According to the scholar, Caravaggio, linking himself to the god who invented wine, reproduced the gesture of this ‘invention’ in the middle of the painting: Bacchus, tightening his arm, is about to gently squeeze the grapes with his fingers. Also according to Morel, the crown of ivy, a classic Dionysian attribute, evokes the inspiration and glory of the poet/painter who in this work, depicting himself holding a bunch of grapes, emphasises the masterful illusionism of his rendering, probably in reference to the episode in which Zeuxis succeeds in tricking a few birds into pecking at some grapes he had painted, while remaining indifferent to the figure he had portrayed (Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia, XXXV, 66).

In this painting, Caravaggio cites a few artists of special importance to him, including Michelangelo Buonarroti and Simone Peterzano, the latter his first teacher in Milan. As observed by Ferdinando Bologna, the pose clearly references a few works by Peterzano, identified by the scholar in the Certosa di Garegnano, and in particular the Persian Sibyl depicted in one of the pendentives in the presbytery, a study for which is in the Fondo Peterzano at the Castello Sforzesco, Milan. According to Herrmann Fiore, the painter also borrowed the position of the body from an engraving of the Ecce Homo by Albrecht Dürer, transforming the crown of thorns into one of ivy and the tombstone into the table upon which Bacchus rests his arm.

As all scholars have noted, the painting bears traces of the Lombard naturalism that, together with the Veneto-Emilian tradition, had been instilled in the painter through Peterzano. This has led most scholars to date the painting to about 1593, in line with the dating proposed by Sir Denis Mahon, who, rejecting the date advanced by Longhi, 1589, instead argued for 1592-94.

The recent theory that the painter arrived in Rome in about 1595 would push the date forward even further (Zuccari 2017, p. 257), unless one supposes that the painting, so packed with references to Caravaggio’s training in Lombardy, was made in Milan and brought to Rome by the artist himself, a theory that would, however, seem to contradict the reports of his most reliable biographers. While this important debate still remains unresolved, all scholars agree that the Sick Bacchus is one of the earliest, if not the earliest, painting by Caravaggio known at this time.

 Antonio Iommelli




Bibliography
  • G. Mancini, Considerazioni sulla pittura, viaggio per Roma, a cura di A. Marucchi, 2 voll., Roma 1956-57, p. 226;
  • G. Baglione, Vite de’ pittori scultori e architetti. Dal Pontefìcato di Gregario XIII del l572 In fino a’ tempi di Papa Urbano VIII nel 1642, Roma 1642, p. 136;
  • S. Francucci, La Galleria dell’Illustrissimo e Reverendissimo Signor Scipione Cardinale Borghese cantata da S. F. Di Roma il dì XVI di luglio 1613 (Arch. Seg. Vat., Fondo Borghese, Serie IV, 103 manoscritto. Arch. Gall. Borghese, copia fotografica. Pubblicato in Arezzo nel 1647), st. 266;
  • F. Scannelli, Il Microcosmo della Pittura, Cesena 1657, pp. 198-99; 
  • A. Manazzale, Itinerario di Roma, Roma 1794, p. 396; 
  • G. Piancastelli, Catalogo dei quadri della Galleria Borghese in Archivio Galleria Borghese, 1891, p. 412; 
  • A. Venturi, Il Museo e la Galleria Borghese, Roma 1893, p. 139; 
  • L. Venturi, Note sulla Galleria Borghese, “L’Arte”, XII, 1909, pp. 39, 41; 
  • L. Venturi, in “L’Arte”, XIII, 1910, pp. 272, 276; 
  • L. Venturi, Opere inedite di Michelangelo da Caravaggio, in “Bollettino d’Arte”, VI, 1912, p. 4; 
  • R. Longhi, Due opere di Caravaggio, in “L’Arte”, XVI, 1913, p. 162; 
  • G. Rouchès, Le Caravage, Paris 1920, p. 87; 
  • M. Marangoni, II Caravaggio, Firenze 1922, p. 39; 
  • H. Voss, Die Malerei des Barock in Rom, Berlin 1924, p. 446; 
  • V. Golzio, L’Arte del Caravaggio, “Rivista d’Italia e d’America”, XIX, 1925, p. 5; 
  • R. Longhi, Precisioni nelle Gallerie Italiane. La R. Galleria Borghese. Andrea del Sarto, in “Vita Artistica”, II, 1927, pp. 28-31;
  • M. Marangoni, Arte Barocca, Firenze 1927, pp. 135, 145, 157; 
  • E. Benkard, Caravaggio, Studien, Berlin-Wilmersdorf 1928, p. 184, n. 58; 
  • R. Longhi, Precisioni nelle Gallerie Italiane, I, La R. Galleria Borghese, Roma 1928, p. 201; 
  • N. Pevsner, P. Grautoff, Barockmalerei in den Romanischen Ländern, Wildpark-Potsdam 1928, p. 132; 
  • L. Zahn, Caravaggio (mit einem Kapitel über: Caravaggio und die Kunst der Gegenwart, von Georg Kirsta), Berlin 1928, pp. 44, 58; 
  • L. Schudt, Caravaggio, Wien 1942, p. 53; 
  • R. Longhi, Ultimi studi sul Caravaggio e la sua cerchia, in “Proporzioni”, I, 1943, p. 100; 
  • A. De Rinaldis, Catalogo della Galleria Borghese, Roma 1948, p. 59; 
  • E. Arslan, Appunto su Caravaggio, in “Aut-Aut” (5), V, 1951, p. 3; 
  • J. Clark, R. Longhi, Alcuni pezzi rari nell’Antologia della critica caravaggesca, in “Paragone”, XVII, 1951, p. 53;
  • G. Castelfranco, Mostra del Caravaggio, in “Bollettino d’Arte”, XXXVI, 1951, p. 285; 
  • Catalogo della Mostra del Caravaggio e dei Caravaggeschi, (Milano, Palazzo Reale, 1951), pp. 13, 14;
  • P. Della Pergola, Itinerario della Galleria Borghese, Roma 1951, p. 39; 
  • D. Mahon, Caravaggio’s Cronology, in “The Burlington Magazine”, XCIII, 1951, p. 234; 
  • M. Valsecchi, Caravaggio, Milano-Firenze 1951, tavv. 46-47; 
  • L. Venturi, II Caravaggio, Novara 1951, pp. 29, 55, 56; 
  • C. Baroni, Tutta la pittura del Caravaggio, Milano, pp. 14, 24; 
  • R. Longhi, Il Caravaggio, Milano 1952, p. 32, tav. XXXVIII; 
  • D. Mahon, Addenda to Caravaggio, in “The Burlington Magazine”, XC-XCVI, 1952, 94, p. 19; 
  • L. Menassé, Il Caravaggio a Roma, in “Capitolium”, XXVII, 1952, pp. 95, 96; 
  • L. Grassi, Il Caravaggio, dispense a cura di M. Carreri e M. R. Donati, Roma 1953, p. 181; 
  • F. Baumgart, Caravaggio, Kunst und Wirklichkeit, Berlin 1955, pp. 40, 105; 
  • W. Friedländer, Caravaggio Studies, Princeton-New York 1955, pp. 169, 172; 
  • K. Bauch, Zur Ikonographie von Caravaggios Frühwerken, in Kunstgeschichtliche Studien für Hans Kauffmann, a cura di W. Braunfels, Berlin 1956, pp. 252-261;
  • L. Ferrara, Galleria Borghese, Novara 1956, p. 134; 
  • C. Maltese, La formazione culturale di Vincenzo Gemito e i suoi rapporti con il Caravaggio, in ’Colloqui del Sodalizio’, II, 1956, p. 43; 
  • S. Samek, S. Ludovici, Vita del Caravaggio dalle testimonianze del suo tempo, Milano 1956, pp. 52, 104; 
  • H. Wagner, Michelangelo da Caravaggio, Bern 1958, p. 231; 
  • P. Della Pergola, La Galleria Borghese. I Dipinti, II, Roma 1959, pp. 76-78, n. 112; 
  • H. Sedlmayr, Caravaggio, das Selbstportrait der Galeria Borghese, in “Hefte des Kunsthistorischen Seminars der Universität München”, VII-VIII, 1962, pp. 23-25; 
  • J.B. Lynch, Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo’s self-portrait in the Brera, in "Gazette des beaux-art", LXIV, 1964, pp. 189-197;
  • M. Fagiolo dell’Arco, Le “Opere di misericordia”: contributo alla poetica del Caravaggio, in “L’Arte”, I, 1968, pp. 37-61, pp. 54-55, nota 32; 
  • R. Longhi, Il Caravaggio, Roma-Dresda 1968;
  • R. Longhi, "Me pinxit" e Quesiti caravaggeschi, 1928-1934, Firenze 1968;
  • M. Calvesi, Caravaggio o la ricerca della salvazione, in “Storia dell’arte”, III, 1971, pp. 98-102; 
  • C.L. Frommel, Caravaggios Frühwerk und der Kardinel Francesco Maria del Monte, in "Storia dell’Arte", IX-X, 1971, pp. 5-52;
  • D. Posner, Caravaggio’s Homo-Erotic Early Works, in "The Art Quarterly", XXXIV, 1971, pp. 302-324;
  • M.T. Franco Fiorio, Note su alcuni disegni inediti di Simone Peterzano, in "Arte Lombarda", XIX, 1974, pp. 87-100, in part. p. 89, fig. 21;
  • M. Marini, Io, Michelangelo da Caravaggio, Roma 1974, p. 88, fig. 4; pp. 335-36, n. 4; 
  • H. Röttgen, Il Caravaggio. Ricerche e interpretazioni, Roma 1974, pp. 157, 171, 183-88, fig. 90; 
  • M. Calvesi, Letture iconologiche del Caravaggio, in Novità sul Caravaggio. Saggi e contributi, a cura di M. Cinotti, Cinisello Balsamo, Milano 1975, pp. 93-95, 100-101; 
  • G.A. Dell’Acqua, Interpreti del Caravaggio antichi e nuovi, in Novità sul Caravaggio. Saggi e contributi, a cura di M. Cinotti, Cinisello Balsamo, Milano, 1975, pp. 150-55; 
  • H. Röttgen, La "Resurrezione di Lazzaro" del Caravaggio, in Novità sul Caravaggio. Saggi e contributi, a cura di M. Cinotti, Cinisello Balsamo, Milano, 1975, 1975, p. 61, fig. 131; 
  • B. Contardi, Caravaggio, in I classici della pittura, I, Roma 1979, p. 7; 
  • A. Moir, Caravaggio, Milano 1982, p. 66; 
  • M. Cinotti, Michelangelo Merisi detto il Caravaggio, in I pittori bergamaschi. 4. Il Seicento. 1, Bergamo 1983, pp. 505-510, n. 52;
  • H. Hibbard, Caravaggio, New-York-London 1983;
  • C. Bertelli, scheda in The Age of Caravaggio, catalogo della mostra (New York, The Metropolitan Museum, 1985), a cura di M. Gregori, New York 1985, pp. 60-62;
  • M. Gregori, scheda in The Age of Caravaggio, catalogo della mostra (New York, The Metropolitan Museum, 1985), a cura di M. Gregori, New York 1985, pp. 31, 214, 241, 244;
  • K. Herrmann Fiore, "Il Bacco malato autoritratto del Caravaggio ed altre figure bacchiche degli artisti", in "Quaderni di Palazzo Venezia, VI, 1989, pp. 95-134; 
  • M. Calvesi, Le realtà del Caravaggio, Torino 1990, pp. 12-14, 224-228;
  • A.W.G. Posèq, Bacchic themes in Caravaggio’s juvenile works, in “Gazette des beaux-arts”, VI, 1990, pp. 113-121; 
  • E. Gilbert Creighton, Caravaggio and his two cardinals, University Park 1995, p. 250; 
  • A. Cottino, scheda in La natura morta al tempo di Caravaggio, catalogo della mostra (Roma, Musei Capitolini, 1995-1996), a cura di A. Cottino, Roma 1995, p. 102, n. 10 (con bibliografia precedente);
  • A. von Mattyasovszky-Lates, Caravaggio’s Peaches and Academic Puns, in "Word and Image", II, 1995, pp. 55-60;
  • C.L. Frommel, Caravaggio, Minniti e il Cardinale Francesco Maria del Monte, in Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. La vita e le opere attraverso i documenti, atti del convegno (Roma, 1995), a cura di S. Macioce, Roma 1996, pp. 18-41;
  • K. Christiansen, Thoughts on  the Lombard training of Caravaggio, in Come dipingeva il Caravaggio, atti della giornata di studio (Firenze, Roma 1992), a cura di M. Gregori, Milano 1996, pp. 7-28;
  • L. Ventura, scheda in Immagini degli Dei. Mitologia e collezionismo tra Cinquecento e Seicento, catalogo della mostra, (Lecce, Fondazione Memmo, 1996-1997), a cura di C. Cieri Via, Milano 1996, pp. 202-203; 
  • M. Bona Castellotti, Caravaggio fa ritorno a Caravaggio, in "Il Sole - 24 ore", 13 luglio 1997, p. 35;
  • M. Gallo, Materiali per Caravaggio. Bibliografia di Michelangelo Merisi 1980-1996, in Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, La vita e le opere attraverso i documenti, atti del convegno internazionale (Roma, 1996), a cura di S. Macioce, Roma 1997, pp. 370-398;
  • S. Rossi, Peccato e redenzione negli autoritratti del Caravaggio, in Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, La vita e le opere attraverso i documenti, atti del convegno internazionale (Roma, 1996), a cura di S. Macioce, Roma 1997, pp. 316-327;
  • M. Gallo, in Scienza e miracoli nell’arte del ’600. Alle origini della medicina moderna, catalogo della mostra (Roma, Museo Nazionale di Palazzo Venezia, 1998), a cura di S. Rossi, Milano 1998, pp. 326-328;
  • M. Heimbürger, Caravaggio e Dürer, in “Paragone/Arte”, XLIX, 1998 (1999), pp. 19-48; 
  • A.W.G. Pòseq, Caravaggio and the Antique, London 1998;
  • C.R. Puglisi, Caravaggio, London 1998, pp. 53-54, 395, n.2; 
  • S. Santolini, scheda in L’Anima e il Volto. Ritratto e fisiognomica da Leonardo a Bacon, catalogo della mostra (Milano, Palazzo Reale, 1998-1999), a cura di F. Caroli, Milano 1998, pp. 180-181;
  • T. Wilson-Smith, Caravaggio, London 1998, p. 32; 
  • I. Sgarbozza, scheda in Velàzquez a Roma, Velàzquez e Roma, catalogo della mostra (Roma, Museo e Galleria Borghese, 1999-2000), a cura di A. Coliva, Milano 1999, p. 89, n. 13; 
  • P. Moreno, C. Stefani, Galleria Borghese, Milano 2000, p. 201; 
  • K. Herrmann Fiore, Caravaggio e la quadreria del Cavalier d’Arpino, in Caravaggio: la luce nella pittura lombarda, catalogo della mostra (Bergamo, Accademia Carrara di Belle Arti, 2000), a cura di C. Strinati, R. Vodret, Milano 2000, pp. 57-76; 
  • K. Herrmann Fiore in Il Cinquecento lombardo: da Leonardo a Caravaggio, catalogo della mostra (Milano, Museo Civico d’Arte Contemporanea, 2001), a cura di F. Caroli, Milano 2000, pp. 474-476, n. IX.2; 
  • M. Marini, Cremona fedelissima tra Milano, Venezia e Ferrara: dai fratelli Campi al Caravaggio, in Il Cinquecento lombardo: da Leonardo a Caravaggio, catalogo della mostra (Milano, Civico Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, 2000-2001), a cura di F. Caroli, Milano 2000, pp. 51-52; 539-549; 
  • M. Gallo, Patologia e tradizione umanistica nella ritrattistica romana di fine Cinquecento: il cosiddetto "Bacchino malato" di Caravaggio", in Umanesimo e mondo della salute, a cura di G. Cinà, Torino 2001, pp. 43-70, 55;
  • M. Marini, Caravaggio,"pictor praestantissimus": l’iter artistico completo di uno dei massimi rivoluzionari dell’arte di tutti i tempi, Roma 2001, pp. 136-37, 373-75; 
  • J.T. Spike, Caravaggio, New York, 2001, pp. 16-19, n. 3;
  • K. Herrmann Fiore in Degustazione d’arte. Enologia mitica, spirituale, simbolica e metafisica nelle collezioni pubbliche di Roma, a cura di C. Biasini Selvaggi, Roma 2003, pp. 53-54; 
  • M. Marini, Caravaggio a Caravaggio, Caravaggio 2003;
  • J.F. Moffitt, Caravaggio in Context: Learned Naturalism and Renaissance-Humanism, Jefferson 2004;
  • F. Lucantoni, in Dürer e l’Italia, catalogo della mostra (Roma, Scuderie del Quirinale, 2007), a cura di K. Herrmann Fiore, Milano 2007, p. 330, n. VII.4;
  • S. Schütze, Caravaggio. The complete work, London 2009, pp. 31, 244, n. 1;
  • L. Sickel, Gli esordi di Caravaggio a Roma. Una ricostruzione del suo ambiente sociale, in "Romisches Jahrbuch der Bibliotheca Hertziana", XXXIX, 2009-2010, pp. 31-32;
  • M. Gregori, I ricordi del Caravaggio, in Gli occhi di Caravaggio: gli anni della formazione tra Venezia e Milano, catalogo della mostra (Milano, Museo Diocesano, 2011), a cura di V. Sgarbi, Cinisello Balsamo 2011, pp. 17-25;
  • G. Berra, Frutti e fiori dell’Arcimboldo "cavati dal naturale". L’influsso sulla nascente natura morta lombarda e sul giovane Caravaggio, in Arcimboldo. Artista milanese tra Leonardo e Caravaggio, catalogo della mostra (Milano, Palazzo Reale, 2011), a cura di S. Ferino Pagden, Milano 2011, pp. 335-345;
  • Caravaggio & his followers in Rome, catalogo della mostra (Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada, 2011; Fort Worth, Kimbell Art Museum, 2011-2012), a cura di D. Franklin, S. Schütze, New Haven 2011, p. 314;
  • A. Cesarini, Il musico, il barbiere, il ferraiolo, una testimonianza inedita sui primi anni di Caravaggio a Roma, in Caravaggio a Roma. Una vita dal vero, catalogo della mostra (Roma, Archivio di Stato, 2011), a cura di M. Di Sivo, O. Verdi, Roma 2011, pp. 54-59;
  • F. Curti, Sugli esordi di Caravaggio a Roma. La bottega di Lorenzo Carli e il suo inventario, in Caravaggio a Roma. Una vita dal vero, catalogo della mostra (Roma, Archivio di Stato, 2011), a cura di M. Di Sivo, O. Verdi, Roma 2011, pp. 65-76;
  • M. Marini, Caravaggio,"pictor praestantissimus": l’iter artistico completo di uno dei massimi rivoluzionari dell’arte di tutti i tempi, Roma 2011, pp. 43-44; 
  • F. Curti, Costantino Spada "regattiero de quadri vecchi" e l’amicizia con Caravaggio, in "Roma moderna e contemporanea", XIX, 2012, pp. 167-197;
  • G. Forgione, scheda in Caravaggio tra arte e scienza, a cura di V. Pacelli, G. Forgione, Napoli 2012, p. 367;
  • C. Giantomassi, Il Bacchino malato Borghese, la Giuditta Barberini, la Sant’Orsola Doria, il San Giovannino disteso di collezione privata: la tecnica esecutiva e la vicenda del restauro, in Caravaggio tra arte e scienza, a cura di V. Pacelli, G. Forgione, Napoli 2012, pp. 101-121;
  • P. Morel, Un (auto)ritratto cristo-bacchico di Boltraffio, in "Art history", I, 2013, pp. 296-304;
  • L. Teza, Caravaggio e il frutto della virtù. il "Mondafrutto" e l’Accademia degli Insensati, Milano 2013, pp. 14-15;
  • A. Coliva, scheda in da Guercino a Caravaggio, catalogo della mostra (Roma, Palazzo Barberini, 2014-2015), a cura di A. Coliva, M. Gregori, S. Androsov, Urbino 2014, p. 80;
  • A. Lemoine, Sotto gli auspici di Bacco. La Roma dei bassifondi, da Caravaggio ai Bentvueghels, in Bassifondo del Barocco. La Roma del vizio e della miseria, catalogo della mostra (Roma, Villa Medici, 2014-2015), a cura di F. Cappelletti, A. Lemoine, Roma 2014, pp. 25-27;
  • P. Morel, scheda in Bassifondo del Barocco. La Roma del vizio e della miseria, catalogo della mostra (Roma, Villa Medici, 2014-2015), a cura di F. Cappelletti, A. Lemoine, Roma 2014, pp. 130-131;
  • P. Morel, Renaissance dionysiaque. Inspiration bachique, imaginaire du vin et de la vigne dans l’art européen (1430-1630), Paris 2015;
  • C. Giantomassi, D. Zari, scheda in Caravaggio. Opere a Roma. Tecnica e stile, a cura di R. Vodret Adamo, II, Cinisello Balsamo (Milano) 2016; pp. 48-63;
  • F. Paliaga, Caravaggio nella bottega del Cavalier d’Arpino, in L’origine della natura morta in Italia. Caravaggio e il Maestro di Hartford, catalogo della mostra (Roma, Galleria Borghese, 2016-2017), a cura di A. Coliva, D. Dotti, Milano 2016, pp. 89-105, 217-219;
  • R. Gandolfi, A. Zuccari, I primi anni di Caravaggio a Roma, in Dentro Caravaggio, catalogo della mostra (Milano, Palazzo Reale, 2017-2018), a cura di R. Vodret, Milano 2017, pp. 255-257; 
  • R. Vodret, Dentro Caravaggio, in Dentro Caravaggio, catalogo della mostra (Milano, Palazzo Reale, 2017-2018), a cura di R. Vodret, Milano 2017, pp. 204-205;
  • G. Berra, Il Caravaggio da Milano a Roma, in Il giovane Caravaggio "sine ira et studio", a cura di A. Zuccari, Roma 2018, pp. 31-45;
  • M.C. Terzaghi, Caravage à Rome. notes pour un parcours, in Caravage à Rome. Amis et ennemis, catalogo della mostra (Parigi, Musée Jacquemart-André, 2018-2019), a cura di F. Cappelletti, M.C. Terzaghi, P. Curie, Bruxelles 2018, p. 48;
  • L. Teza, Considerazioni sul Mondafrutto, sul Bacchino malato e su "un ritratto di villano", in Il giovane Caravaggio "sine ira et studio", a cura di A. Zuccari, Roma 2018, pp. 56-63;
  • C. Brouard, in Peterzano. Allievo di Tiziano, maestro di Caravaggio, catalogo della mostra (Bergamo, Accademia Carrara, 2020), a cura di S. Facchinetti, F. Frangi, P. Plebani, M.C. Rodeschini), Milano 2020, pp. 218-219;
  • M.C. Terzaghi, scheda in Peterzano. Allievo di Tiziano, maestro di Caravaggio, catalogo della mostra (Bergamo, Accademia Carrara, 2020), a cura di S. Facchinetti, F. Frangi, P. Plebani, M.C. Rodeschini), Milano 2020, pp. 252-255;
  • M.C. Terzaghi, Caravaggio a Roma. Note per un percorso, in Caravaggio a Parigi. Novità e riflessioni sugli anni romani, a cura di F. Cappelletti, M.C. Terzaghi, P. Curie, Roma-Napoli 2021, pp. 11-12.