Galleria Borghese logo
Search results for
X
No results :(

Hints for your search:

  • Search engine results update instantly as soon as you change your search key.
  • If you have entered more than one word, try to simplify the search by writing only one, later you can add other words to filter the results.
  • Omit words with less than 3 characters, as well as common words like "the", "of", "from", as they will not be included in the search.
  • You don't need to enter accents or capitalization.
  • The search for words, even if partially written, will also include the different variants existing in the database.
  • If your search yields no results, try typing just the first few characters of a word to see if it exists in the database.

Melissa

Luteri Giovanni called Dosso Dossi

(Tramuschio? 1487 ca - Ferrara 1542)

This painting is datable to the early years of the Ferrara painter’s mature period. It depicts a commanding woman in the foreground wearing a turban and brightly coloured, sumptuous clothing. Set in a woody landscape, she is sitting in the middle of a circle marked with symbols that evoke the Jewish Cabala. She holds a torch in her left hand and a tablet covered with geometric drawings in her right.

The woman has been identified as a sorceress, initially Circe and later Melissa, according to the description in Ludovico Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso (8.14–15). In this episode, Melissa frees some knights from an enchantment, reference to which might be found in the small human figures hanging from the tree on the left.

The restoration of the painting revealed some changes of mind, most importantly the initial inclusion, in place of the mastiff, of a standing armoured male figure, who was the recipient of the sorceress’s gaze.

The painting probably entered the collection of Scipione Borghese in about 1607-1608, arriving from Ferrara through Cardinal Enzo Bentivoglio.


Object details

Inventory
217
Location
Date
c. 1518
Classification
Period
Medium
oil on canvas
Dimensions
170 x 172 cm
Provenance

Borghese collection, documented in Manilli 1650, p. 82; Inv. 1693, room VIII, no. 42; Inv. 1765, p. 16, Room of Saturn; Inv. 1790, room IX, no. 16; Inventario fidecommissario Borghese 1833, p. 10, no. 19. Purchased by the Italian state, 1902.

Exhibitions
  • 1935, Parigi
  • 1940, Napoli
  • 1985, Roma, Palazzo Venezia
  • 1998-1999, Ferrara, Palazzo dei Diamanti – New York, Metropolitan - Los Angeles, P. Getty Museum
  • 2003-2004, Bruxelles, Palais des Beaux-Arts
  • 2014, Torino, Venaria Reale
  • 2016-2017, Ferrara, Palazzo dei Diamanti
Conservation and Diagnostic
  • 1815 Lorenzo Principi
  • 1914 Francesco Cocchetti
  • 1995 Emmebici(diagnostics)
  • 1996 Guido Piervincenzi (ditta Elena Zivieri)
  • 2020/2021 Leonardo Severini
  • 2021 Measure 3D di Danilo Salzano (laser scan 3D)
  • 2021 ArsMensurae di Stefano Ridolfi (diagnostics)
  • 2021 IFAC-CNR (diagnostics)

Commentary

An original and early work among the extremely popular body of images drawn from Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, this painting was part of the group of works from Ferrara that entered the collection of Cardinal Scipione Borghese during its early years. It is first mentioned by Jacopo Manilli (1650), who described it as ‘a sorceress casting spells, by the Dossi brothers’, correctly attributing the work from the start.

While at first identified as a generic sorceress and then as Circe, the enchantress with the beautiful curls described by Odysseus in Canto X of Homer’s Odyssey, Julius von Schlosser was the first (1900) to recognise the figure in this important painting as Melissa, featured in Canto VIII of Ludovico Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso. The benevolent godmother of the Este line is represented here casting the spells that will free Ruggiero and his knights from Alcina’s enchantment, which turned them into flowers, trees and animals. Dosso structured this image as a complex emblem celebrating the sorceress and hence also the Este, a role ascribed to this ‘Good Sorceress’ by Ariosto himself, who had her speak words of prophecy about the descendance of the dukes of Ferrara.

Besides the correspondence of the magic circle, the little wax men hanging from the tree trunk on the left, the dog looking at the viewer and the armour to the literary source, this interpretation is further confirmed by the X-ray of the painting (Coliva 1998). The X-ray revealed the original presence of an armoured figure inside the circle that was later covered up by the painter. This element makes the reading of the subject at once both complex and complete, pointing to the episode in Canto III when Melissa, leading Bradamante to Merlin’s tomb, speaks words of praise of the descendants of the two paladins, followed by a procession inside the sacred circle of all the Este progeny, up to Alfonso and his cardinal brother Ippolito.  Based on this reading, the armoured figure must have been Bradamante, later covered over to add elements that could be more readily understood from Canto VIII (Farinella 2008; idem 2012; idem 2014). Melissa’s imaginary speech would have been completed in the abstract by the duke, his family and the court, privileged viewers of the painting (Caneparo 2015).

The painting can be dated to the years immediately following the first edition of the epic poem (1516), and so about 1518 (Romani in Ballarin 1994-1995). This dating is confirmed by Dosso’s style, which in this work combines the eccentricity of transalpine painting with the expressive experimentation of Giorgione and Titian, found especially in the luminous palette of the landscape dominated by the monumental, Sybil-like Melissa, inspired as much by the classicism of Titian as by that of Raphael.

Lara Scanu




Bibliography
  • I. Manilli, Villa Borghese fuori di Porta Pinciana, Roma 1650, pp. 82-83
  • D. Montelatici, Villa Borghese fuori di Porta Pinciana con l’ornamenti che si osservano nel di lei Palazzo, Roma 1700, pp. 222-223
  • G. Baruffaldi, Vite de’ pittori e scultori ferraresi, I, Ferrara 1844-1846, p. 284
  • C. Laderchi, La pittura ferrarese, in A. Frizzi, Memorie per la Storia di Ferrara raccolte da Antonio Frizzi, Ferrara 1848 (1856), p. 71
  • J. Burckhardt, Der Cicerone. Eine Anleitung zum Genuss der Kunstwerke Italiens, Basel 1855 (ed. it. 1952), p. 1030
  • G. Morelli, Kunstkritische Studien über italienische Malerei. Die Galerien zu München und Dresden, Leipzig 1890 (ed. 1892), pp. 204, 214-215
  • A. Venturi, Le Gallerie di Roma, «Nuova Antologia di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti», CXVIII, 34, 1891, p. 427
  • A. Venturi, Il Museo e la Galleria Borghese, Roma 1893, p. 127
  • R. H. Benson, Introduction, in Exhibition of Pictures, Drawings and Photographs of Works of the School of Ferrara-Bologna, 1440-1550, also of Members of the Houses of Este and Bentivoglio, catalogo della mostra a cura di R. H. Benson, London 1894, p. 51
  • G. Gruyer, L’art Ferrarais a l’époque des Princes d’Este, Parigi 1897, p. 410;
  • G. Gruyer, L’art Ferrarais a l’époque des Princes d’Este, II, Parigi 1897, pp. 261, 274, 286
  • J. von Schlosser, Jupiter und die Tugend. Ein Gemälde des Dosso Dossi, «Jahrbuch der Preußischen Kunstsammlungen», 21, 1900, pp. 268-269
  • A. Venturi, La Galleria Crespi in Milano. Note e raffronti, Milano 1900, p. 33
  • B. Berenson, The North Italian Painters of the Renaissance, New York-London 1907, p. 210
  • E. G. Gardner, The Painters of the School of Ferrara, London 1911, pp. 151-152, 160, 232
  • W. C. Zwanzinger, Dosso Dossi mit besonderer berucksichtigung seines Künst lerischen verältnisses zu seinem bruder Battista, Leipzig 1911, pp. 57-58, 117
  • L. Venturi, Giorgione e il giorgionismo, Milano 1913, pp. 192-193
  • H. Mendelsohn, Das Werk der Dossi, München 1914, pp. 33, 67-69
  • R. Longhi, Precisioni nelle gallerie italiane. I, Galleria Borghese, «Vita Artistica», II, 1927 (ed. 1967), p. 311
  • R. Longhi, Precisioni nelle gallerie italiane. Galleria Borghese, Roma 1928, p. 343
  • A. Venturi, Storia dell’Arte Italiana. La pittura del Cinquecento, IX, 3, Milano 1928, pp. 939-940
  • C. Ricci, North Italian Painting of the Cinquecento, Piedmont, Liguria, Lombardy, Emilia, Firenze-Parigi 1929, pp. 42-43
  • L. Balniel, K. Clarck, E. Modigliani, A Commemorative Catalogue of the Exhibition of Italian Art Held in the Galleries of the Royal Academy, Burlington House, London, Oxford-London 1931, n. 338
  • B. Berenson, Italian Pictures of Renaissance. A list of the Principal Artist and their Works with an Index of Places, Oxford 1932, p. 175
  • N. Barbantini, Esposizione della pittura ferrarese del Rinascimento, catalogo della mostra (Ferrara, Palazzo dei Diamanti, maggio-ottobre 1933), Venezia 1933, n. 195
  • R. Longhi, Officina Ferrarese, Roma 1934 (ed. 1956), pp. 86, 120
  • R. Buscaroli, La pittura di paesaggio in Italia, Bologna 1935, p. 215
  • B. Berenson, Pitture italiane del Rinascimento: catalogo dei principali artisti e delle loro opere con un indice dei luoghi, Milano 1936, p. 151
  • H. Bodmer, Il Correggio e gli Emiliani, in Storia della Pittura Italiana, Novara 1943, p. XXXVIII
  • P. Della Pergola, La Galleria Borghese. I Dipinti, I, Roma 1955, n. 36
  • E. Arslan, Una Natività di Dosso Dossi, «Commentari», VIII, 4, 1957, pp. 260-261
  • L. Baldass, Zur Erforschung des "Giorgionismo" bei den Generationsgenossen Tizians, «Jahrbuch der Kunsthistorischen Sammlungen in Wien», 57, 1961, p. 83
  • E. Battisti, L’Antirinascimento, Milano 1962 (ed. 1989), pp. 159-160
  • R. Longhi, Un «San Gerolamo» del Dosso, «Paragone», XIV, 161, 1963, pp. 58-60
  • A. Martini, Capolavori nei secoli, il Rinascimento e il Manierismo, Milano 1963, p. 44
  • M. G. Antonelli Trenti, Notizie e precisazioni sul Dosso Giovane, «Arte Antica e Moderna», 28, 1964, p. 406
  • P. Dreyer, Die Entiwicklung des jungen Dosso (I): ein Beitragzur Chronologie der Jungendwerke des Meisters bis zum Jahre 1522, «Pantheon», (II) XXII, 6, 1964, pp. 364-365, 373
  • A. Mezzetti, Il Dosso e Battista ferraresi, Ferrara 1965, pp. 24-25, 112
  • L. Puppi, Dosso Dossi, Milano 1965
  • F. Gibbons, An emblematic portrait by Dosso, «Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes», 29, 1966, p. 435
  • R. A. Turner, The Vision of Landscape in Renaissance Italy, Princeton 1966, pp. 134-135
  • J. H. Whitfield, Leon Battista Alberti, Ariosto, and Dosso Dossi, «Italian Studies», XXI, 1966, p. 24 nota 9
  • G. C. Argan, Il Cinquecento, in Storia dell’Arte Italiana, Firenze 1968, p. 136
  • B. Berenson, Italian Pictures of the Renaissance. Central Italian and North Italian Schools, I, London 1968, p. 113
  • F. Gibbons, Dosso and Battista Dossi Court Painters at Ferrara, Princeton 1968, pp. 121-122, 198-200, n. 59
  • M. Calvesi, Recensione a Felton Gibbons, Dosso and Battista Dossi Court Painters at Ferrara, «Storia dell’Arte», 1-2, 1969, p. 171
  • S. J. Freedberg, Painting in Italy 1500 to 1600, Harmondsworth 1971 (ed. 1975), p. 318
  • D. A. Brown, A print Source for Parmigianino at Fontanellato, in Per A. E. Popham, Parma 1981, p. 49
  • Paesaggio con figura. 57 dipinti della Galleria Borghese esposti temporaneamente a Palazzo Venezia, catalogo della mostra (Roma, Palazzo Venezia, 30 luglio-30 settembre 1985), Roma 1985, n. 4
  • P. Coccia, Le illustrazioni dell’Orlando Furioso (Valgrisi 1556) già attribuite a Dosso Dossi, «La Bibliofilia», 93, 1991, p. 285
  • A. Ballarin, in Le siecle de Titien: l’âge d’or de la peinture a Venise, catalogo della mostra (Parigi, Grand Palais 9 marzo - 14 giugno 1993) a cura di G. Fage, Parigi 1993, p. 406-408
  • A. Ballarin, Giovanni de Lutero dit Dosso Dossi, in Le siecle de Titien: l’âge d’or de la peinture a Venise, catalogo della mostra (Parigi, Grand Palais 9 marzo - 14 giugno 1993) a cura di G. Fage, Parigi 1993, pp. 460, 463
  • A. Coliva, Galleria Borghese, Roma 1994, p. 116
  • C. Del Bravo, L’Equicola e il Dosso, «Artibus et Historiae», 30, 1994, p. 77
  • A. Ballarin, Dosso Dossi. La pittura a Ferrara negli anni del Ducato di Alfonso I, Cittadella (PD) 1994-1995, pp. 40, 65, 69-70, 72, 79
  • V. Romani, in A. Ballarin, Dosso Dossi. La pittura a Ferrara negli anni del Ducato di Alfonso I, Cittadella (PD) 1994-1995, scheda 372, p. 312
  • J. Yarnal, Trasformations of Circe. The history of an Enchantress, Urbana-Chicago 1994, pp. 116-118
  • G. Roberts, The Descendants of Circe. Witches and Renaissance Fictions, in Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe. Studies in Culture and Belief, a cura di J. Barry, Cambridge 1996, p. 188
  • V. Romani, Alfonso I, Dosso e la Maniera moderna, in La pittura in Emilia e in Romagna. Il Cinquecento, a cura di V. Fortunati Pietrantonio, Milano 1996, pp. 99-100
  • M. Lucco, Due capolavori di Dosso Dossi, l’Apollo e la Melissa (già maga Circe), in Apollo e Dafne del Bernini nella Galleria Borghese, a cura di K. Herrmann Fiore, Milano 1997, pp. 66-69
  • A. Bayer, Dosso Dossi and the role of Prince in North Italy, in Dosso’s Fate: Painting and Court Culture in Renaissance Italy, a cura di L. Ciammitti, S. F. Ostrow, S. Settis, Los Angeles 1998, p. 234
  • A. Coliva, Le opere di Dosso Dossi nella Collezione Borghese: precisazioni documentarie, iconografiche, e tecniche, in Dosso Dossi. Pittore di corte a Ferrara nel Rinascimento, catalogo della mostra (Ferrara, Civiche Gallerie d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, 26 settembre – 14 dicembre 1998; New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 14 gennaio – 28 marzo 1999; Los Angeles, The J. Paul Getty Museum 27 aprile – 11 luglio 1999) a cura di P. Humphrey e M. Lucco, Ferrara 1998, pp. 74-76
  • B. Fredericksen, Collecting Dosso: the Trail of Dosso’s Paintings from the late Sixteenth Century onward, in Dosso’s Fate: Painting and Court Culture in Renaissance Italy, a cura di L. Ciammitti, S. F. Ostrow, S. Settis, Los Angeles 1998, p. 375
  • K. Herrmann Fiore, Guida alla Galleria Borghese, Roma 1998, p. 37
  • P. Humfrey, in Dosso Dossi. Pittore di corte a Ferrara nel Rinascimento, catalogo della mostra (Ferrara, Civiche Gallerie d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, 26 settembre – 14 dicembre 1998; New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 14 gennaio – 28 marzo 1999; Los Angeles, The J. Paul Getty Museum 27 aprile – 11 luglio 1999) a cura di P. Humphrey e M. Lucco, Ferrara 1998, pp. 114-118, scheda 12
  • A. Rothe, D. W. Carr, The Technique of Dosso Dossi: Poetry with Paint, in Dosso Dossi. Pittore di corte a Ferrara nel Rinascimento, catalogo della mostra (Ferrara, Civiche Gallerie d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, 26 settembre – 14 dicembre 1998; New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 14 gennaio – 28 marzo 1999; Los Angeles, The J. Paul Getty Museum 27 aprile – 11 luglio 1999) a cura di P. Humphrey e M. Lucco, Ferrara 1998, p. 59
  • C. Stefani, in Galleria Borghese, a cura di P. Moreno e C. Stefani, Milano 2000, p. 117
  • K. Herrmann Fiore, in Il museo senza confini. Dipinti ferraresi del Rinascimento nelle raccolte romane, a cura di J. Bentini e S. Guarino, Milano 2002, pp. 132-135, scheda 8
  • K. Hermann Fiore, in Un Rinascimento singolare. La corte degli Este a Ferrara, catalogo della mostra (Bruxelles, Palais des Beaux-Arts, 3 ottobre 2003-11 gennaio 2004), a cura di J. Bentini, G. Agostini, Cinisello Balsamo 2003, p. 257, scheda 180
  • R. Kilpatrick, Death by Fire. Ovidian and Other inventions in Two Mythological Paintings of Dosso Dossi (1486-1534), «Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome», 49, 2004 (2005), pp. 127-151
  • S. Macioce, Figure della magia, in L’incantesimo di Circe. Temi di magia nella pittura da Dosso Dossi a Salvator Rosa, Roma 2004, pp. 27-37
  • C. S. Wood, Countermagical Combinations by Dosso Dossi, «Res», 45-50, 2006, pp. 151-170
  • E. Fumagalli, Sul collezionismo di dipinti ferraresi a Roma nel Seicento: riflessioni e aggiunte, in Dosso Dossi. La pittura a Ferrara negli anni del ducato di Alfonso I, a cura di A. Ballarin, A. Pattanaro, Cittadella (PD) 2007, pp. 177-178, 181
  • G. Fiorenza, Dosso Dossi. Paintings of Myth, Magic and the Antique, University Park 2008, pp. 101-126
  • P. Morel, Mélissa. Magie, Astes et Démons dans l’Art Italienne de la Renaissance, Parigi 2008, pp. 232-239
  • V. Farinella, Alfonso I d’Este. Le immagini e il potere, Milano 2014, pp. 440-464
  • F. Caneparo, Di molte figure adornato. L’Orlando furioso nei cicli pittorici tra Cinque e Seicento, Milano 2015, pp. 31-34
  • B. M. Savy, in Orlando furioso 500 anni. Cosa vedeva Ariosto quando chiudeva gli occhi, catalogo della mostra (Ferrara, Palazzo dei Diamanti, 24 settembre 2016 – 8 gennaio 2017) a cura di G. Beltramini e A. Tura, Ferrara 2016, pp. 180-181, scheda 69